University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota
http://www.umn.edu/
612-625-5000
Home
Make a Gift
 
 
HeartDatabase
 
Right Atrium
Right Ventricle
Pulmonary Trunk
Left Atrium
Left Ventricle
Aorta
Coronary Arteries
Cardiac Veins
External Images
MRI Images
Comparative Imaging
3D Modeling
Plastinates
 
Anatomy Tutorial
Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Tutorial
Comparative Anatomy Tutorial
Conduction System Tutorial
Congenital Defects Tutorial
Coronary System Tutorial
Device Tutorial
Echocardiography Tutorial
Physiology Tutorial
 
Project Methodologies
Cardiovascular Devices and Techniques at U of Minnesota
Acknowledgements
References and Links
Atlas in the media
 
Surgery Department
Principal
 
 
 
CMR Tutorial
Catheters Pacing Systems Valves Stents Structural Repairs
Stenting Procedures
 
3D Models
 
Anaglyphs
 
Bifurcation Exploration

(External link to medtronic.com)

 

History of Stents

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide, accounting for approximately one third of all deaths over the age of 351. In the 1960s, with the advent of open heart surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass, this allowed physicians to surgically treat CAD via coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Although minimally invasive off-pump techniques have improved CABG patient outcomes and reduced their hospital stays, the surgery is still considered a major procedure. Numerous medical technologies have been developed to aid in performing percutaneous interventional procedures within the coronary arteries, often referred to as PCIs (Percutaneous Coronary Interventions).

Stent Delivery

The first PCI procedures, performed in 1977, consisted of advancing a balloon catheter through the coronary artery until the narrowed, diseased section of the vessel; usually an area with plaque buildup, was bridged. A balloon would then be inflated at a high pressure to reopen the artery and allow the return of more normal blood flow. By 1986 advances in materials and manufacturing techniques led to the addition of a coronary stent positioned on the outside of the balloon. A coronary stent is a device typically comprised of a metal mesh designed to provide a scaffolding to support the walls of the artery so to keep its lumen patent (open). Today, the placement of coronary stents also significantly delays restenosis (the formation of new blockage) in an artery, when compared to balloon dilation alone. Stents were initially constructed from uncoated bare metal. However, novel materials and manufacturing techniques have resulted in polymer coatings and internal reservoirs that can deliver immunosuppressive and/or antiproliferative drugs to further minimize or eliminate the possibility of restenosis. While these drug-eluting stents (DES) have been a great improvement over angioplasty, it is generally considered that procedural outcomes will be further improved with the continued development of novel devices and/or techniques.


Plaque Deposition

Depositions of plaque in the coronary artery vessels, can be quite varied and some occlusions may be located bifurcations of the coronaries. A classification system known as the Medina system2 has become widely accepted and is recommended because of it is considered simple and effective way to describe bifurcation lesions. However, it has its limitations as it cannot be used to describe specific bifurcation angles, degrees of calcification and/or lengths of plaque buildup. In bifurcation lesions like these, treatment may only be possible by placing stents in both the main vessel and the side branch. Due to the specificity of every patient's coronary anatomy, it is extremely difficult to construct a "one size fits most" bifurcation stent. Because of this, interventional cardiologists typically must manipulate multiple single vessel stents to conform them to a bifurcation. Every year, an elite group of bifurcation specialists known as the European Bifurcation Club (EBC) meet to discuss the most recent recommendations regarding bifurcation stenting. Each year is finalized by the development of a consensus3, in which the opinions, ideas and statements regarding bifurcation management are summarized.


Under the pulldown menus provided in this tutorial, the reader will find several techniques, observed using the Visible Heart® methodologies4; i.e., designed to keep both the main and side branches vessels patent. Each technique varies by the order of operations taken as well as where the procedure starts and ends. The MADS classification5 was developed as a decision making tree to be coupled with the Medina system to offer better patient care. Using the Medina classification system, an interventional cardiologist can classify plaque deposition and follow up with MADS to narrow down which technique is best to treat the individual patient. As shown in the image below, each bifurcation technique is comprised of a series of steps; current recommendations are described in detail below.

Plaque Deposition

 

Stent Deployment

Stent Deployment

Using fluoroscopy as the main imaging modality, guidewires are placed so that there is at least one wire down each of the bifurcation vessels. Once the wires are positioned, a stent can be fed along the wires and placed in the corresponding vessel. Upon proper positioning, a given stent is then inflated to a high pressure (˜12 or more atm) to expand the stent within the lumen. This is just the beginning of bifurcation techniques as additional measures are needed to ensure proper apposition and that flows through side branches are not obstructed, or that they are at risk of endothelization over time to cause any remaining obstruction.


Proximal Optimization Technique

Proximal Optimization Technique (POT)

The proximal optimization technique (POT) is described as a methodology to improve the end results of stent scaffolding for treating bifurcation lesions. In this procedure an appropriately-sized balloon is inflated in the main vessel just proximal to the carina, the ridge of the vessel that splits the vessel into its bifurcations. The technique when performed properly should improve stent apposition in the proximal main vessel which, in turn, also facilitates side branch access after main vessel stent implantation.


Kissing Balloon Technique

Kissing Balloon Technique (KBT)

A kissing balloon technique (KBT) is a strategy used to properly apposition the stents along the bifurcation while keeping the native bifurcating carina from deviating from its original orientation. This begins with placing guidewires down both the main and side branches and then with either one, two or no stents already in place. Two properly sized balloons are fed down the guidewires and placed so that the belly of these balloons are along the carina. Once positioned, they are both inflated to the same pressures, so to ensure that the carina is not shifted into either one or the other side of the given bifurcation.


Crush

Crush

There may be instances where the interventional cardiologist may decide to purposefully crush a stent that has been placed. This is planned to be performed during the 'Crush' and 'DK Crush' techniques. Typically, a stent is initially placed in the side branch with part of its proximal end protruding into the parent branch. After stent deployment, a balloon that was already in position within the main branch vessel is inflated to crush the stent along the lumen wall. This is usually followed by placing another stent in the main branch (see Crush and DK Crush videos for more information).


Rewire

Rewire

After deployment of an initial stent, regardless of which branch, there are two needs that must be addressed; flow into the opposite branch is hindered and the secondary guidewire has been jailed. In these cases, the guidewire from the main branch is retracted and then attempted to be fed through the stent struts and into the side branch. The jailed wire is then pulled back proximal to the stent and rewired through the main branch. After successful rewiring, additional steps can be taken to perform various bifurcation techniques: e.g., a kissing balloon technique and a final POT.

References:

  1. Lloyd-Jones, D., Adams, R. J., Brown, T. M., Carnethon, M., Dai, S., De Simone, G., ... & Go, A. (2010). Heart disease and stroke statistics--2010 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation, 121(7), e46.
  2. Stankovic G, MD, PhD., et al. "Percutaneous coronary intervention for bifurcation lesions:2008 consensus document from the fourth meeting of theEuropean Bifurcation Club" EuroIntervention. 2009;5:39-49.
  3. Adrian P. Banning, MD; Jens Flensted Lassen, MD; Francesco Burzotta MD, PhD et al. "Percutaneous coronary intervention for obstructive bifurcation lesions: the 14th consensus document from the European Bifurcation Club". EuroIntervention 2019;15:90-98. DOI: 10.4244/EIJ-D-19-00144
  4. Burzotta F, MD, PhD., Cook B, PhD, Iaizzo PA, PhD, Singh J, PhD, Louvard Y, PhD, Latib A, MD, PhD. "Coronary bifurcations as you have never seen them: the Visible Heart® Laboratory bifurcation programme." EuroIntervention 2015
  5. Jens Flensted Lassen MD, PhD et al., "Percutaneous coronary intervention for coronary bifurcation disease: consensus from the first 10 years of the European Bifurcation Club meetings". EuroIntervention 2014;10:545-560

Historia de los stents

La enfermedad coronaria (EC) es una de las principales causas de muerte en todo el mundo y representa aproximadamente un tercio de todas las muertes en mayores de 35 años1. En la década de 1960, el advenimiento de la cirugía a corazón abierto con derivación cardiopulmonar (bypass) permitió a los médicos el tratamiento quirúrgico de la EC a través de la cirugía de revascularización miocárdica (coronary artery bypass graft [CABG]). Aunque las técnicas mínimamente invasivas de revascularización sin circulación extracorpórea han mejorado los resultados de los pacientes sometidos a CABG y han reducido el tiempo de hospitalización, la cirugía aún se considera un procedimiento mayor. Se han desarrollado múltiples tecnologías que permiten realizar procedimientos de manera percutánea dentro de las arterias coronarias, comúnmente denominados ICP (intervención coronaria percutánea).

Stent Delivery

Las primeras intervenciones coronarias percutáneas realizadas en 1977 se llevaron a cabo avanzando un catéter con balón a través de la arteria coronaria hasta atravesar la zona de la lesión ocasionada por una acumulación de placa. Luego, se inflaba el globo a alta presión para reabrir la arteria y permitir el retorno de flujo sanguíneo. En 1986, los avances en materiales y técnicas de fabricación llevaron a la adición de un stent coronario colocado en la parte exterior del balón. Un stent coronario es un dispositivo compuesto por una malla metálica diseñada para proporcionar una estructura que soporte las paredes de la arteria y mantener su lumen permeable (abierto). Hoy en día, la implantación de los stents coronarios retrasa significativamente la reestenosis (la formación de un nuevo bloqueo) de la arteria cuando se compara con la dilatación con balón. Los stents se construyeron inicialmente a partir de una estructura metálica sin recubrimiento. Sin embargo, nuevos materiales y técnicas de fabricación han dado como resultado revestimientos poliméricos que actúan como depósito y liberadores de fármacos inmunosupresores y / o antiproliferativos para minimizar o eliminar aún más la posibilidad de reestenosis. Si bien estos stents liberadores de fármacos (DES - drug eluting stents por sus siglas en inglés) suponen una gran mejora con respecto a la angioplastia con balón, se espera que los resultados del procedimiento mejoren aún más con el desarrollo continuo de nuevos dispositivos y/o técnicas.


Plaque Deposition

Las placas ateromatosas de las arterias coronarias pueden ser variadas, algunas se localizan en las bifurcaciones de las coronarias. Un sistema de clasificación conocido como la clasificación de Medina2 es ampliamente aceptado y se recomienda porque se considera una forma simple y eficaz de describir las lesiones ubicadas en una bifurcación. Sin embargo, tiene sus limitaciones, ya que no se puede utilizar para describir ángulos específicos de la bifurcación, grados de calcificación y/o longitudes de de la placa. En las lesiones ubicadas en una bifurcación, el tratamiento sólo puede ser posible colocando endoprótesis tanto en la rama principal como en la rama lateral. Debido a la variabilidad en la anatomía coronaria entre pacientes, es extremadamente difícil construir un stent de bifurcación de "talla única". En vista de lo anterior, los cardiólogos intervencionistas generalmente deben manipular múltiples stents de un solo vaso para adaptarlos a una bifurcación. Cada año, un grupo élite de especialistas en bifurcaciones conocido como European Bifurcation Club (EBC) se reúne para discutir las recomendaciones más recientes sobre la colocación de stents en bifurcaciones. Cada año finaliza con el desarrollo de un consenso, en el que se resumen las opiniones, ideas y recomendaciones sobre el manejo de las lesiones de la bifurcación3.


Bajo los menús desplegables proporcionados en este tutorial, el lector encontrará varias técnicas que utilizan las metodologías del VisibleHeart®4; diseñadas para mantener permeables los vasos de las ramas principal y lateral. Cada técnica varía según de acuerdo al orden de las operaciones realizadas, así como el comienzo y el final del procedimiento. La clasificación MADS5 se desarrolló como un árbol de toma de decisiones para combinar con la clasificación de Medina con el fin de ofrecer una mejor atención al paciente. Con el sistema de clasificación de Medina, un cardiólogo intervencionista puede clasificar la placa y realizar un seguimiento con MADS para determinar qué técnica es la mejor para tratar de manera individualizada al paciente. Como se muestra en la siguiente imagen, cada técnica de bifurcación consta de una serie de pasos. Las recomendaciones actuales se describen en detalle a continuación.

Plaque Deposition

 

Stent Deployment

Implantación del stent

Utilizando la fluoroscopia como modalidad principal, se insertan guías de modo que haya al menos una guía en cada uno de los vasos de la bifurcación. Una vez colocadas las guías, se puede introducir un stent a lo largo de estas y colocarlo en el vaso correspondiente. Después de un adecuado posicionamiento, se infla a una presión alta (˜ 12 atm o más) para expandir el stent dentro del lumen. Este es solo el comienzo de las técnicas de bifurcación, ya que se necesitan medidas adicionales para garantizar una posición adecuada y que los flujos a través de las ramas laterales no se obstruyan, o que con el tiempo corran el riesgo de endotelización y reoclusión.


Proximal Optimization Technique

Técnica de optimización proximal (proximal optimization technique POT - por sus siglas en inglés)

La técnica de optimización proximal (POT) está descrita como un método para mejorar los resultados de la implantación de stents para el tratamiento de la bifurcación. En este procedimiento se infla un globo de tamaño apropiado en el vaso principal inmediatamente próximo a la carina, la cresta que divide el vaso en sus bifurcaciones. La técnica, cuando se realiza correctamente, debería mejorar la posición del stent en la rama principal proximal, lo que a su vez, también facilita el acceso a la rama lateral después de la implantación del stent en el vaso principal.


Kissing Balloon Technique

Kissing Balloon Technique (KBT)

La técnica de kissing balloon (KBT) es una estrategia que se utiliza para posicionar adecuadamente los stents a lo largo de la bifurcación y, al mismo tiempo, evitar que la carina de la bifurcación se desvíe de su orientación original. Esta comienza colocando las guías en las ramas principal y lateral y luego con uno, dos o ningún stent ya en posición. Dos balones del tamaño adecuado se introducen en las guías y se colocan de manera que la curvatura de estos balones quede a lo largo de la carina. Una vez posicionados, ambos se inflan a las mismas presiones, para garantizar que la carina no se mueva hacia uno u otro lado de la bifurcación.


Crush

Crush (Aplastamiento)

Puede haber casos en los que el cardiólogo intervencionista decida aplastar a propósito un stent previamente implantado. Esto se realiza durante las técnicas 'Crush' y 'DK Crush'. Un stent se coloca inicialmente en la rama lateral con parte de su extremo proximal sobresaliendo hacia la rama principal. Una vez expandido el stent, se infla un balón que ya estaba en posición dentro de la rama principal para aplastar el stent a lo largo de la pared del lumen. Esto suele ir seguido de la colocación de otro stent en la rama principal (consulte los videos de Crush y DK Crush para obtener más información).


Rewire

Rewire

Después de la colocación de un stent inicial, independientemente de la rama, hay dos situaciones que deben abordarse; se obstruye el flujo hacia la rama opuesta y la guía secundaria queda atrapada. En estos casos, la guía de la rama principal se retrae y luego se intenta introducir a través de las celdas del stent hacia la rama lateral. A continuación, se retira la guía atrapada en sentido proximal al stent y se vuelve a introducir a través de la rama principal. Después de un reajuste exitoso de las guías, se pueden optar por realizar varias técnicas de bifurcación: por ejemplo, la técnica de kissing balloon y POT.

Referencias:

  1. Lloyd-Jones, D., Adams, R. J., Brown, T. M., Carnethon, M., Dai, S., De Simone, G., ... & Go, A. (2010). Heart disease and stroke statistics--2010 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation, 121(7), e46.
  2. Stankovic G, MD, PhD., et al. "Percutaneous coronary intervention for bifurcation lesions:2008 consensus document from the fourth meeting of theEuropean Bifurcation Club" EuroIntervention. 2009;5:39-49.
  3. Adrian P. Banning, MD; Jens Flensted Lassen, MD; Francesco Burzotta MD, PhD et al. "Percutaneous coronary intervention for obstructive bifurcation lesions: the 14th consensus document from the European Bifurcation Club". EuroIntervention 2019;15:90-98. DOI: 10.4244/EIJ-D-19-00144
  4. Burzotta F, MD, PhD., Cook B, PhD, Iaizzo PA, PhD, Singh J, PhD, Louvard Y, PhD, Latib A, MD, PhD. "Coronary bifurcations as you have never seen them: the Visible Heart® Laboratory bifurcation programme." EuroIntervention 2015
  5. Jens Flensted Lassen MD, PhD et al., "Percutaneous coronary intervention for coronary bifurcation disease: consensus from the first 10 years of the European Bifurcation Club meetings". EuroIntervention 2014;10:545-560

 

 

 

 
 
© 2021 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer. Privacy Statement